Tags

, , , , , ,

In turning away from the horrors of Youtube (what the hell was with that bird?!), we turn to one of the masters of horror fiction:

Not entirely unrelated to the blog’s current emphasis, let’s see what Edgar Allan Poe had to say on Mozart!

From the “Marginalia”, via the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore:

XXXVII.

Mozart declared, on his death-bed, that he “began to see what may be done in music;” and it is to be hoped that DeMeyer and the rest of the spasmodists will, eventually, begin to understand what may not be done in this particular branch of the Fine Arts.

For context, I recommend this page at www.allmusic.com:

His [Poe’s] only complete comment on music was both in praise of Mozart and a dig at notorious “Lion Pianist” Leopold de Meyer, known for big hair, fancy pyrotechnics and utter lack of taste and sensitivity; “Mozart declared, on his death-bed, that he ‘began to see what may be done in music;’ and it is to be hoped that De Meyer and the rest of the spasmodists will, eventually, begin to understand what may not be done in this particular branch of the Fine Arts.” Music plays a role in some of the tales as well — Roderick Usher is described as playing “improvised dirges,” including one on “the wild air of the last waltz of Von Weber.”

Elizabeth Barrett Browning comes closest to understanding Poe’s musical side. His poetry is musical, owing to its deliberate cadence and the way his lines and syllables mark out a definitive rhythm when read aloud.

Advertisements